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========================================================================= *\ Menu Color \* ========================================================================= */ .top-main-menu li a /*!========================================================================= *\ Shopping cart olor \* ========================================================================= */ .card-icon i /*!Nearly half (48%) of smartphone-dependent Americans have had to cancel or shut off their cell phone service for a period of time because the cost of maintaining that service was a financial hardship.In addition, 30% of smartphone-dependent Americans say that they “frequently” reach the maximum amount of data that they are allowed to consume as part of their cell phone plan, and 51% say that this happens to them at least occasionally.Below are some more details about these major findings on the state of smartphone ownership in America today, based on a series of surveys conducted by Pew Research Center in association with the John S. Knight Foundation: Nearly two-thirds of Americans are now smartphone owners, and for many these devices are a key entry point to the online world 64% of American adults now own a smartphone of some kind, up from 35% in the spring of 2011.Smartphone ownership is especially high among younger Americans, as well as those with relatively high income and education levels.Each of these figures is substantially higher than those reported by smartphone owners with more access options at their disposal.Smartphones are used for much more than calling, texting, or basic internet browsing.

Even as a substantial minority of Americans indicate that their phone plays a central role in their ability to access digital services and online content, for many users this access is often intermittent due to a combination of financial stresses and technical constraints.A majority of smartphone owners use their phone to follow along with breaking news, and to share and be informed about happenings in their local community.Smartphones help users navigate the world around them, from turn-by-turn driving directions to assistance with public transit. An “experience sampling” of smartphone owners over the course of a week illustrates how young adults have deeply embedded mobile devices into the daily contours of their lives.Additionally, African American and Latino smartphone owners look up public transit information on their phones at higher rates than whites (37% of black smartphone owners, 30% of Latinos, and 21% of whites do this at least on occasion).When asked to choose from a series of statements representing how they feel about their phone, a substantial majority of smartphone owners feel that these devices are “helpful” rather than “annoying,” “connecting” rather than “distracting,” and that they represent “freedom” rather than a “leash.” At the same time, smartphone owners are relatively divided on the essential necessity of mobile connectivity: 54% say that their phone is “not always needed,” while 46% say that it is something they “couldn’t live without.” And while a substantial 80% majority of smartphone owners describe their phone as “worth the cost,” 19% — and 29% of those who pay more than 0 per month for service — describe it as a “financial burden.” In addition to the surveys of smartphone owners that form the main findings of this report, the Pew Research Center also conducted an “experience sampling” survey of smartphone owners as part of this project.